Historic Phoenix Architecture

New home buyers come to Phoenix, Arizona for the booming economy, but they are lured to stay because of historic features that the city offers. If you are moving to Phoenix, you want a Phoenix real estate agent who has a firm understanding of the local real estate market and is working for you to help you find your dream property. There are many new homes in Phoenix that have been influenced by the stunning historic architecture that you can see around town, and your historic architecture is ready to work with you so that you can find and acquire just the right Phoenix property for your purposes. >

One historic property in Phoenix, Arizona that exemplifies one of the beautiful architectural styles is the Union Station in downtown Phoenix. This building, built in 1923 by the Santa Fe and the Arizona Eastern (representing the Southern Pacific) railroads, features the Mission Revival style. This style emphasizes stucco wall surfaces, red tile roof, wide overhanging eaves, shaped Mission dormer or roof parapets, and porch roofs that are held up by large square piers that usually have an arch above them. This style was popular in California, owing to the Spanish influence in that region. It moved from California to other parts of the West when the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific railroads used the style for the stations they built. Mission Revival style began to be seen in the early 1890s and continued in popularity until 1920, or near the end of the first World War.

Another famous Phoenix building is the Luhrs Building, designed by Trost & Trost architecture firm from El Paso, Texas and built in 1924. Henry C. Trost was the designer, and his work evidences his ability to design in many styles, most notably Art Deco, Mission Revival, Prairie and Pueblo Revival, many showing the influence of the famed work of Chicago school architect Louis Sullivan. The Luhrs Building emphasizes the top half of the upper stories through the use of a heavy cornice and marble ornamentation, both of which are in keeping with the Prairie style and Sullivan influence.

An architect famous for his work in Southwestern architecture is Will Bruder. He designed the Burton Barr Central Library, including such features as an open, one-acre large reading room and the “Crystal Canyon,” the name for the stairwell and elevator that utilize glass and steel. Sunlight into the building is directed by motorized louvers on the southern side of the building, and on equinox days you can enjoy the sunlight alignment.

The rich history of these buildings continues to influence the design style of new homes in Phoenix to this day. Phoenix realtors know where to find historically influenced properties, so contact them today.

Wayne Hemrick has been a Phoenix real estate agent , property appraiser in the Phoenix area for 20 years. He has his own very successful real estate and mortgage lending business in the Phoenix area.